Is going the Solo Ads way right in the case of your Business?

So, you wish to build up your email list fast, or you want to the word to be spread like wildfire about the next week’s launch of a new product? 


Some marketers would just swear by the concept of solo ads. And though the solo ads do work fabulously in some cases, they are not always the right choice for every business; these can prove to be risky investments for some. Just continue reading on to figure out if they are the right fit for you. 


What is really meant by a solo advertisement?


If you have been in affiliate marketing for some time, you would have definitely heard the term solo ad. However, if that has not been part of your business, here is a summary: Solo ads basically advertisements that you buy from the owners of other email lists. They are usually sent as devoted emails – so basically, the entire message is all about you promoting yourself or your product. 


This is how they actually work: You first find a list of solo ads that you feel interested in. Then you get in touch with the owner or you actually buy access rights to the given list from the website that belongs to them. There are two ways of buying – you could either pay by how many of the subscribers your emails will get sent to, you also have the option of buying the number of clicks that your mail will fetch. 


If everything goes as per the plan, and the subscribers actually click, and the clicks do convert well. At the end of the day, you will end up having conversions in solo ads which would have cost you a lot less as compared to the other kinds of advertising.


However, it is far from being perfect. Solo ads, to be really honest, have a very hazy reputation. Most of the companies do not even want to go anywhere near them. They usually work the best for information marketers and affiliates in the online marketing niche. 


That being said, there are also a ton of marketers out there who will say that they owe their entire business success to the existence of solo ads and that it was solo ads that got them started in the first place. So, it is definitely worth your while to at least figure out how they actually work.


So who do the solo ads work the best for?


It works well for the marketers who have a little extra budget for this. You have a couple of hundred dollars? That is just enough for you to be able to take the solo ads out for a small test ride.

If your business happens to be in a niche area where the costs of PPC are just way too high for you to even consider. In that case your CPC with respect to running solo ads may be way less when compared to what you would have otherwise paid to Google AdWords or Microsoft Bing. So, in your case the solo ads may be worth taking for a test. 

If your business happens to be in a niche area which has been completely saturated with content (like weight loss or affiliate marketing)

If your business operates in a niche area where the competition is very intense in getting traffic from search engines

If you are just about to launch a new product, or if your need is to send traffic to a given page very quickly. You just do not have time to write up guest posts, or to build up an audience, and do anything which will take more than a couple of days to get the results back.


 A big and fat warning


Solo ads usually are sold by a single guy (or a single girl) sellers. What this really means is that you are going to be dealing directly with the owner of the list. And due to the nature of this, there are some risks that are involved.


There is even a higher risk that is involved as some of the lists for solo ads were built using “not ideal” ways. In the best case, this particular list may have been constructed by converting the traffic from some website that may be in the same niche as you. Or it may well be that the owner of the list just bought some advertising and then built a list with some squeeze page. 


However, is also very much possible that the email address is acquired using a “Scraping” software. This is just a piece of software that goes from one site to another and gathers any email addresses it happens to come across. And as you can well see, such email addresses have a very low tendency to actually convert.


It is highly likely that the list you are sending emails to may be somewhere in the middle of those two ends of awful and good. 


Good for you, there are some ways of telling if you are dealing with an authentic owner of a list and an authentic list:


If it sounds too good for it to be really true, then that may very well be the case. Always avoid people that make huge promises.

Try to use friends, forums and any authentic online resources that you can find so that you can verify the owner of the list and see if the lists which they provide are worth spending your money for. Run a couple of deep searches for the name of the list owner and their website. Go through their accounts on social media. Check the relevant forums to ensure that no one has raised a complaint about them. 

Start out really small. Don’t just shell out a thousand bucks on any list when you are starting out for the first time. Start very small – preferably as much smaller as the owner of the list will allow you to. Expect to be testing at least three to five lists in a very limited manner before you actually move ahead by making a bigger investment.